Passionate and thought provoking!

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Charlotte Cornwell’s conversation with Friends last Friday was wide in its scope, honest, irreverent  forthright and highly entertaining. She was critical of the current parlous state of the foremost London dramatic arts colleges. Her deep concern for young people, and the difficulty they face gaining access to higher education in the performing arts, was evident and has inspired her to set up a Young People’s Project that will target the raw talent of some of our most disadvantaged youth. She was confident that the £350,000 needed for the project would be found.

Charlotte described Shakespeare’s verse as ‘a language of imagery’, and as a ‘muscular language’ that needs to be spoken with passion and conviction. She shared with us her insights into the role of Gertrude in Hamlet  and the Countess in ‘Alls Well that Ends Well’  making a convincing case for understanding these two women as mothers first, each attempting to do their best for their much loved offspring.

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Passionate and thought provoking!

Charlotte Cornwell’s conversation with Friends last Friday was wide in its scope, honest, irreverent  forthright and highly entertaining. She was critical of the current parlous state of the foremost London dramatic arts colleges. Her deep concern for young people, and the difficulty they face gaining access to higher education in the performing arts, was evident and has inspired her to set up a Young People’s Project that will target the raw talent of some of our most disadvantaged youth. She was confident that the £350,000 needed for the project would be found.

Charlotte described Shakespeare’s verse as ‘a language of imagery’, and as a ‘muscular language’ that needs to be spoken with passion and conviction. She shared with us her insights into the role of Gertrude in Hamlet  and the Countess in ‘Alls Well that Ends Well’  making a convincing case for understanding these two women as mothers first, each attempting to do their best for their much loved offspring.

Charlotte’s frank and engaging talk encouraged the audience to respond and a relaxed and informative discussion ended a very enjoyable event.

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Scandi noir!

Hamlet The nod to ‘Scandi noir’ dramas in the patterned Fair Isle jumpers and Edvard Munch in the surreal faceless fencing masks are both playful and disturbing.  Jonathan Slinger’s Hamlet is unmanned by his indecision before unleashing a terrifying anger that left the audience gasping. Jonathan Slinger plays the Dane with an amazing intensity and power.  Pippa Nixon’s Ophelia is full of pathos and nuance. Her father, played by Robin Soans, is a both pedantic and dominating figure but Soans evinces sympathy for Polonius as he expresses concern and tenderness for his children, making his murder all the more horrific.   Charlotte Cornwell as Gertrude and Greg Hicks as Claudius are convincingly brittle and febrile as they try to shore up a corrupted monarchy and marriage.  Image

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A fantastic theatrical experience!

A Mad World My Masters set in Soho in 1956 this is an ingenious relocation of Middleton’s city comedy to another demi monde characterised by hypocrisy and sleaze. The sheer energy of this production with its live jazz and blues soundtrack, quick fire quips and physical comedy is a complete joy. Get tickets while you still can! 

Mad World plays in the Swan Theatre until 25th OctoberImage

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